Patrick Swanson / December 17,2020

Georgia Surpasses 1M Votes for Senate Runoffs in Less Than a Week of Early Voting

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Georgia Surpasses 1M Votes for Senate Runoffs in Less Than a Week of Early Voting

Georgia’s Senate runoff elections have already surpassed one million votes, less than a week into the state’s early voting period.

Early voting for the runoffs began on Monday. As of Friday approximately 1,123,095 early votes have been cast, according to data from GeorgiaVotes, a website that tracks early voting data.
Data from GeorgiaVotes also shows that at the same point in the general election, roughly 1,223,045 early votes have been cast—indicating a 100,950 vote difference when compared to the early voting numbers in the Senate runoffs.
Among the total number of early votes cast as of Friday, more than 481,000 have been mail-in ballots and over 641,000 were early votes, according to the website.
Using numbers provided by the Georgia secretary of state’s office, The Hill reported that roughly 168,000 votes had been cast on the first day of early voting for the Senate runoffs, which surpassed the 128,000 number of votes submitted on the first day of early voting for the general election.
According to the U.S. Elections Project, created by Michael McDonald, a political science professor at the University of Florida, roughly 24,106 people who did not vote in the general election have already cast their ballot in the Senate runoffs, while 889,991 have voted in both.
Newsweek reached out to the Georgia secretary of state’s elections division for comment, but did not receive a response in time for publication.
The number of early votes cast in Georgia’s Senate runoffs comes less than a month before the January 5 elections, consisting of two races that will decide which political party controls majority of the Senate next year.

Patrick Swanson / December 09,2020

Georgia Tragedy Bears the Mystery of Political Collateral Damage

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Georgia Tragedy Bears the Mystery of Political Collateral Damage

The untimely death and heartbreaking tragedy of the charismatic 20-year-old man with his future ahead of him, Harrison Deal, was a field staffer to Georgia republican politicians, Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue. Harrison Deal was also the boyfriend and best friend of Governor Kemp’s daughter Lucy.
On Friday, December 4, 2020, just outside of Savannah Georgia, at about 10:00 am, the Pooler Police were on a three-car scene of a major accident that took place at 16 eastbound and Pooler Parkway. Neighboring community members reported hearing a large explosive boom and fire filled the air, sealing the fate of this young Georgia political staffer.
The other three individuals caught up in the three-car tragedy were treated on the scene and released unscathed. There was a great deal of chatter on the scene, as witnesses were questioning the tragedy with comments like these:
“It’s more like a car bomb than a normal highway accident.”
“It’s been said that those car explosions in the movies are just for effect because cars that get into even bad wrecks don’t actually blow up like this. Interesting.”
“That’s no freaking crash, that car was blown by a bomb or hit by a missile.”
“Exactly, modern cars don’t burst into flames even at crazy high-speed impacts. Something was either catastrophically wrong with that car or someone planted C4.”
“I worked as a volunteer firefighter in my youth and flaming car wrecks are very rare in modern cars made after the 1980s.”
That’s a car bomb. not an accident.”
Actual footage from the scene was captured and can be seen here: Gov Kemp’s Daughter’s Boyfriend Harrison Deal Dies in Car Accident Under Suspicious Circumstances.

Patrick Swanson / December 04,2020

Trump assails vote integrity while urging turnout in Georgia

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President Donald Trump pressed his grievances over losing the presidential election Saturday, using a rally to spread baseless allegations of misconduct in last month’s voting in Georgia and beyond even as he pushed supporters to turn out for a pair of Republican Senate candidates in a runoff election in January.

Patrick Swanson / November 27,2020

Georgia Secretary of State Says Trump Should Give Up and ‘Leave Quietly’

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Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger stated that President Donald Trump should give up and “leave quietly” from the White House. The secretary of state made these comments in an interview with Atlanta Journal-Constitution published Saturday.
“When you lose an election, you should leave quietly. It’s the will of the people that has been expressed,” stated Raffensperger.
Unlike Georgia Governor Brian Kemp, the secretary of state has been vocal against his critics on social media and through the mainstream media. Earlier this week, Raffensperger published an op-ed with USA Today complaining that he and his family “are now being thrown under the bus” by Trump.
“In the days that followed, a losing presidential campaign refused to accept the facts, following a playbook written by a failed gubernatorial candidate [Stacey Abrams] two years before. A failed senate candidate [Doug Collins] with nothing to do tried to undermine the integrity of Georgia’s elections,” the op-ed says. “A self-described ‘attorney for the damned’ [Lin Wood] took up the cause. An onslaught of fake news and unrepentant disinformation threatened to tear the fabric of our country apart. People on both sides of the aisle generated controversies out of nowhere to stir up trouble.”
Since the initial audit, Trump and other Republicans have called for a review of the absentee ballot signatures. However, Raffensperger hasn’t allowed for one. In response, the president dubbed Raffensperger a “RINO,” or “Republican In Name Only” – a term reserved for individuals accused of holding values and objectives contrary to the standard Republican ideals.

Patrick Swanson / November 26,2020

Breakdown of Sidney Powell’s Lawsuits in Georgia and Michigan

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Attorney Sidney Powell delivered on her promise to file massive election fraud lawsuits in Georgia and Michigan. The Georgia lawsuit was the weightier of the two, totaling 104 pages, with the Michigan lawsuit reaching 75 pages. Both lawsuits and all evidence are included on Powell’s legal defense fund website.
Thanksgiving Eve was an action-packed day for Powell – she followed up the presidential pardoning of her client, General Michael Flynn, by filing both lawsuits just before midnight.
Powell filed the Georgia lawsuit first. In her tweet announcement, she included the news that she’d filed suit in Michigan as well.
“The #Kraken was just released on #Georgia. Complaint being uploaded at DefendingTheRepublic.Org. Exhibits to follow. Also #ReleaseTheKraken in #Michigan @realDonaldTrump @jbinnall @GenFlynn @molmccann @abigailcfrye @jbinnall @Scavino45 @marklevinshow @MariaBartiromo”
The Georgia lawsuit alleged that a combined effort of hacked electronic voting systems and fraudulent absentee ballots were incorporated to rig the election in favor of Democratic candidate Joe Biden. The suit claimed that the Dominion Voting Systems (Dominion) relied on the software that was designed to keep Venezuelan dictator Hugo Chavez in power through vote manipulations.
Further, the suit claimed that Governor Brian Kemp and Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger executed a reckless deal with Dominion to secure the voting systems for the state.
Concerning the absentee ballots, the suit claimed that unlawful early processing and improper auditing took place.

Patrick Swanson / November 13,2020

Tucker Carlson apologized on-air for making a false accusation of voter fraud in Georgia

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Fox News host Tucker Carlson apologized on Friday after a Georgia news station let him know that he had falsely claimed that a dead man voted illegally in the state.
The voter in question, Agnes Blalock, is the wife of the late James Blalock Jr., and her registered voter name is “Mrs. James Blalock, Jr.”
“He’s not voting,” she told the Atlanta-based news station 11 Alive. “He didn’t vote. It was me.”
Carlson issued an apology on-air, saying that “we’re always going to correct when we’re wrong, and we were.”
Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Fox News host Tucker Carlson on Friday apologized on-air after a Georgia news station informed him that he had falsely alleged that a dead man voted illegally in the state during the November election.
During a Thursday segment of “Tucker Carlson Tonight,” Carlson said that a ballot had been cast for James Blalock of Covington, a World War II veteran who passed away in 2006. In reality, the ballot was cast by his widow, who is registered to vote under the name “Mrs. James R. Blalock, Jr.”
President Donald Trump’s campaign, which has issued a litany of lawsuits in a range of swing states to back up debunked claims of voter fraud, inaccurately released Blalock’s name as evidence of a dead individual who cast a ballot, which would point to voter fraud.
“No one quite embodies that story like James Blalock of Covington, Georgia. Mr. Blalock was a mailman for 33 years, until he passed away in 2006,” Carlson said on Thursday. “Fourteen years later, according to state records, he was still mailing things. James Blalock cast a ballot in last week’s election.”

—Rep. Matt Gaetz (@RepMattGaetz) November 12, 2020

Patrick Swanson / November 13,2020

Huesman steps in for Thomas, Mountaineers outlast Georgia State 17-13

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In a tightly-contested defensive battle that saw preseason Sun Belt Offensive Player of the year Zac Thomas go down with a late injury, the Mountaineers edged past Georgia State 17-13 on Saturday at Kidd Brewer. 
“It was a big-time college football game here at The Rock,” App State head coach Shawn Clark said. “It’s never easy to win, but we’re going to celebrate this win and get ready for Coastal.” 
Later that drive after Thomas was injured, App State took its first lead of the game on a 10-yard touchdown run from sophomore running back Camerun Peoples with 4:55 to play. 
On Georgia State’s next drive, the Mountaineer defense held strong, forced a stop, and the offense was able to stay on the field for the rest of the game to secure the victory and remain undefeated against the Panthers all-time (7-0). 
Georgia State drew first blood in the game, converting on four third downs on its first possession before capping it off with a 19-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Cornelious Brown IV to wide receiver Sam Pinckney. Pinckney was alone in the corner of the end zone and made the catch to give the Panthers an early 7-0 lead. 
The Mountaineers offense went three-and-out on their first possession of the game, but senior defensive end Caleb Spurlin forced a fumble that junior linebacker D’Marco Jackson recovered to give possession back to App State at midfield. The Mountaineers had a first and goal from the 2-yard line following a defensive pass interference call, but couldn’t punch it in and settled for a 21-yard field goal from senior kicker Chandler Staton. App State forced three fumbles in the first quarter but only recovered one, and trailed 7-3 going into the second quarter. 

Patrick Swanson / October 23,2020

These Atlanta suburbs show how Georgia has become a 2020 battleground state

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Carolyn Bourdeaux and Rich McCormick
Carolyn Bourdeaux for Congress and Rich McCormick for Congress.

Patrick Swanson / October 16,2020

UMass drops first game of the season 41-0 to Georgia Southern

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The Massachusetts football team lost its first game of the season, falling 41-0 to Georgia Southern. UMass (0-1) was unable to put together much success on either side of the ball, allowing the Eagles (3-1, 1-1 Sun Belt) to run away with the game early on.
“Obviously the results not what we wanted,” coach Walt Bell said. “But just for us to get to this point, I’m really proud of our kids, proud of our administration for giving us an opportunity to play football.”
The Minutemen defense forced a third-and-short on its first series of the game but were unable to stop the Eagles triple-option on third down. After moving the chains, Georgia Southern quarterback Shai Werts found receiver Malik Murray wide open for a 47-yard touchdown on a play-action pass.
Werts found success time and time again, throwing for 128 yards and three touchdowns, adding another 76 yards and a touchdown on the ground.
The Minutemen defense struggled with mishaps in pass coverage, allowing Eagles receivers plenty of open space on all three Werts passing touchdowns. By halftime, Werts’ four touchdowns allowed the Eagles to grow a plentiful 28-0 lead.
“There’s a speed aspect to it, you don’t catch up to until a drive or two into the game,” Bell said of the defensive performance. “You do everything you can to help survive it. We didn’t help the defense very much offensively, which kind of made matters worse knowing those guys were out there for a while.”
Redshirt senior Mike Fallon got the starting nod at quarterback for the Minutemen, providing most of their first half offensive production. Fallon looked comfortable at the helm, completing four of his seven first half passes for 27 yards. Heading into the half, Fallon also led UMass in rushing yards with 31.

Patrick Swanson / October 16,2020

Georgia battery plant project awaits verdict

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A supplier with one of the biggest industrial projects now underway in the U.S. auto industry — a $2.6 billion electric vehicle battery plant in north Georgia — expects a ruling from federal trade officials next week that could shut down construction.
The legal question could create dire complications for two closely watched vehicle programs: Ford Motor Co.’s planned F-150 electric pickup and Volkswagen’s upcoming global family of EVs.
The nub of the situation is whether the Georgia battery supplier, SK Innovation of South Korea, is using stolen intellectual property for the batteries it plans to make — a claim SK denies.
SK, a global producer of electronics, petrochemicals, energy and batteries, has been embroiled since last year in litigation with Korean competitor LG Chem, which claims SK’s batteries use proprietary LG Chem technology, obtained when SK hired away about 100 LG Chem employees.
The feud is now in the hands of the U.S. International Trade Commission, which is due to issue a final ruling Oct. 26.
SK officials have stated that the plant, under construction and preparing to begin hiring employees in Commerce, Ga., about 70 miles northeast of Atlanta, will go forward regardless of the ruling.
Sources familiar with SK’s situation say the company has a limited number of options if LG Chem’s allegations are upheld.